This is a longish (dry? – not many pictures) post – but full of gold for those of us whose lives and passions are swept along in the gathering storm front toward #100PercentLiteracy for Tasmania – and beyond.

Emerging from those of us present at the Colleagues @ The Heart of Literacy event in late June 2019, this feedback is the voice of the people. Making it the voice of deepest felt-need, the voice emerging from the human face of a problem, the words of insight for sparking win-win change, and the power for collaboration and connection.

We invite our collective peril if we ignore such a voice.

But our collective flourishing and the highest expressions of our caring and generative values are invited if we heed.

Over the next few weeks we’ll be posting our considered responses to some of the questions and comments raised in this feedback. To stay in the loop and keep the discussion going, tune into our blog and our Facebook page regularly. And if you would like to be a guest blogger with us, please reach out via our contact form.

The Feedback:

The categories below represent the information-sorting efforts of our Chatter Matters team. But the words are present as received, in their entirety – with some minor editing in cases where anonymity or privacy might be compromised through public release.

Positive Practical Suggestions 

  • We had Jeremy Rockliff, the Minister of Education Tasmania open this wonderful seminar. It would now seem appropriate to approach him to help implement this into all schools. 100 percent literacy priority now! We have the professionals, lets collaborate together to improve Tasmania’s literacy. 48% illiterate is not ok!! Continue to push through this movement to make a difference throughout all of Tasmania. We need to be proactive to get funding. Lets not be re-active anymore! Thank you.
  • Is Chatter Matters being funded by Tas Gov to run this workshop? Will there be a continuation? Will there be one for school leaders such as teachers as the direction becomes cheaper? Do we have Department support for Speech Pathologists to work in this way? i.e. better aligned with schools improving and planning.
  • Thank you. Brilliant day! I think it would have been great for teachers just to have a greater understanding of what speech and language pathologists do. Need to get away from just articulation specialists. If teachers don’t know then they don’t know who to ask for help.
  • It was very beneficial to meet with a number of people who want to see a change in the area of literacy. It was also fantastic to see the research/evidence-based practice being delivered in particular schools. I found it somewhat frustrating at times that we are still and forever reinventing an existing wheel and thought that SLPs should be in school discussions. I spent three years in a funded DoE project targeted at developing literacy frameworks in schools. This was unfortunately short lived and to hear this is still required rather than continuing an existing project, we start something new and develop another policy or list of procedures. We need action and continuity!!
  • Great day, very inspiring but could Chatter Matters please lobby the Tasmanian Government to mandate that every school in Tasmania have a synthetic systematic PA system and a literacy co-ordinator/and or/speech pathologist in every school (worked out on a ratio) to help implement/monitor the program and do 1:1/assessments as needed. Tasmania could then ride the waves of success.
  • I work in a middle class primary school and so see many parents are time poor, they just don’t read to their children. Low literacy levels aren’t just in lower socio-economic schools! Having events like this put the spotlight on literacy levels in Tasmania.
  • Hello Chatter Matters! I would be really interested in speaking with you about possible work/volunteering possibilities. Look forward to speaking with you.
  • This needs to be an annual event to keep to keep the conversation going and simulate action. Thank you.
  • I only found out by word of mouth. Would be amazing next year if it was shared throughout the DoE and to all staff. I would love some PL on the specific programs being used and recommended today!
  • Great to start the conversation – keen to know how this conversation will be continued – where to next? Loved having different perspectives of; senior staff, SLP and parents. Perhaps could have addressed some of the challenges in more depth so that people aren’t upset that this isn’t what is already happening. More information on what has historically been done to address literacy in Tasmania. Who do we talk to/advocate with about increased funding? We need to get this going!
  • A wonderful insight into how successful collaboration between service providers can be. It would be wonderful to have a professional learning opportunity addressing how and what programs to implement. This could be done as a collaborative professional learning opportunity between speech pathologists and teachers. I feel this may allow both parties to see how easily programs can be implemented.
  • I heard about the seminar via a conversation with a senior DoE speech pathologist, but I wasn’t aware of it otherwise. Possibly I missed a notification on the DoE information stream? It would be great to be kept informed of any future seminars. Perhaps you could retain our email addresses for future communications?
  • Great to hear real examples of effective RTI in schools. More inspiration like this please. Would like to hear more about working with students with ASD and language in the future too. Thanks for a very inspiring day!
  • Perhaps more time for panel discussion to share wisdom of experts as well as experience and explore ideas in greater depth. Wonderful speakers!
  • Championing our children with the Government for more collaboration. I loved the video of the two men and the support they have received. Keep doing that!
  • Organise it for next year please? We will encourage our leadership to attend. Food was great, speakers were engaging and lots of food for thought and growth.
  • Phenomenal choices for informative and positive possibilities of implementation in schools. Where does funding and MP knowledge come into effect for this to become a real possibility though?
  • Work to impress on leadership, the importance of utilising funds appropriately – including to support all students, especially those with literacy difficulties, in working in collaboration with speech pathologists to enable better student outcomes.
  • Small group professional learning opportunities about the great work at Chatter Matters. Maybe 3 simple ways to implement it in your own class room.
  • This has been a very positive day. It’s been much more interesting than I thought it would be. I have mixed feelings – loved all of the speakers but feel like I’m against so much to achieve the kind of change they have! Would also love to have the approaches they recommend put into some sort of list, because although I know there needs to be evidence-based consistent approaches, I’m still not 100% sure what they are. – What strategies are used in the classroom? – How are people teaching vocab? – What programs are recommended for phonemic awareness? – What resources are examples of the evidence-based strategies everyone spoke of?
  • It was amazing. So many inspirational people! Maybe Chatter Matters can help us teachers to be less compliant and obliging and more demanding of what we know will help our students, in a way that will support each other and prompt systemic change. I think we work ourselves to destruction to prop up a broken system and it can’t continue.
  • We need to be strategic in how we progress the work in our system (DoE). We only have 47 Speech Pathologists in our state and we need to carefully consider how best they can work with our schools to improve outcomes for our students.

 Regarding the Involvement of Leadership

  • A very informative, inspirational day – shame more principals and senior educators were not here! Thank you.
  • Perhaps you could implement a Chatter Matters day just for leadership teams (Principals, Deputy Principals, Learning Support Coordinators) from all sectors to discuss the way we can all work together to improve literacy learning by supporting each other.
  • Wow, what an inspiring day. Thank you. Moving forward: Presenting such a session to the policy makers and team leaders of our Catholic Education system – bringing all education leaders in Tasmania together to collaborate on literacy.
  • It would have been good to have an example of collaboration from Department of Education in Tasmania. Hoping there will be a follow up with more principals; or better would be to run a similar day at a Principal forum (DoE). Thanks for showcasing these stories and giving food for thought.
  • How can we engage principals and leadership teams to participate in these wider discussions?  If Jeremy can see the value and importance of today then hopefully this can be communicated to a wider audience.
  • I wish more senior staff were encouraged to attend. They have the power to make this happen. Very informative day, thank you.
  • Thank you, a very inspiring day. I would have liked to see more specifics on the “how to” for programs that were discussed. I also think we need support from the top-down: principals and senior staff, to implement change (system-wide).
  • Let’s do it again next year with principals in attendance. Principals need to hear this stuff.
  • Needs to be repeated next year with involvement of all school principals! Thank you.
  • Thank you for organising this event. Fantastic leadership. The incorporation of Speech Pathology teams into schools and teachers as presented by Pam Thuan was inspiring and exciting. We are advocating for change amongst a small group of parents with support from a private SLP funded through NDIS. Now to bring schools to the table without the kicking and screaming (Individual teachers have been fantastic.)
  • Great day, was very inspiring. Maybe invite more movers and shakers (principals, ministers, policy makers) to facilitate change. Keep the conversation going.
  • I particularly enjoyed hearing from Pamela Thuan. Her information was relevant and helpful! All in all, a very positive experience. Hopefully more principals and DoE reps attend next time.

Things We Can Do Better

  • While I acknowledge the expertise of speech pathologists, there is also a great deal of expertise amongst the teaching profession and leadership. In some ways I felt that the work of teachers was being undervalued. The term ‘evidence-based’ was used a lot but there was no information shared about what evidence – who did the research? Why? How much research? We need to be strategic not have pockets doing different things.
  • Ensure content abbreviations are relevant/clear to all who attend – as a teacher, some aspects were clear to speechies (e.g. types of screening) but not to teachers.
  • Has been well organised and flowed smoothly. Not a fan of group sharing with strangers but found the triad informative. I didn’t like the progression to the bigger groups as much. Catering was excellent.
  • It would be great to include people from the public schools in the area as the speakers. There are fabulous things happening in many public schools, but (especially for parents in the audience) this was not felt.
  • Invite Department of Education Tasmania Speech Pathologists to talk.
  • It’s still a question – How do we implement this? How do we meet the needs of our SLP caseload for speech/meal management/fluency etc? Will a discussion need to be, that a part of our caseload can’t be met? Will private SLP’s need to be allowed to work in the state system?
  • Hoping these changes will be implemented, but so frustrated with the current system. Not enough time or training to help the ever-increasing number of students who need more and more help every year. Teacher Assistant stretched between 9 classes over 20 hours/week with no time for preparation or communication with teachers of speechies.

 Distilled Insights & ‘Aha’ Moments – Content of the ‘Hearts’

  • Multi-Disciplinary Collaboration
  • Affirmation
  • One Speech therapist per school! It’s not just about speech correction, it’s about developing their language skills ready for reading, writing and communicating.
  • Literacy intervention teachers paid for to attend training for CELF5 screener.
  • Collaboration – speech pathologists need to be allowed time to interact with staff teachers and TAs so they can learn from each other.
  • We need more Speech Pathologists! We also need training/courses available at the University of Tasmania.
  • Less talk more action!! Stop changing programs that work.
  • Speech Pathologist role clarity
  • Policy – consistency follow through
  • Great ideas but SLP’s are overloaded already. We need more time.
  • Cooperation
  • Action in literacy
  • Communication
  • Inspiration
  • Ongoing teacher training/professional learning to improve pedagogical content knowledge.
  • The importance of learning to differentiate teaching practice. Continuing conversation with Speech pathologists and literacy team at DoE.
  • Collaboration between teachers and speech pathologists improves learning outcomes for all students. Leadership understanding is needed as part of the way forward to create change.
  • So much talk about not enough time/resources/funding!!! We do need to advocate for that to achieve #100percentliteracy… But we already do have some resources. I am a speech pathologist in schools and I think it does matter how I do things with my limited resources. I could start changing how I do things and collaborate more in language and literacy. Keen for a whole school approach!
  • Very encouraging to see so many people from different fields having the same goal of everyone working together to support the literacy development.
  • I hope for a two-way learning with teachers and Speech Pathologists – that we teach each other, learn from each other and appreciate each other.
  • There is so much vulnerability around this stuff but people were sharing it – that seems like a place from which people can make change, ask for and give assistance. Key allocation of resources as a response to need. Key leadership in schools to lead change. Key professional learning for all.
  • I have realised the value of collaboration. In order to provide the best possible outcomes for our students, all stakeholders should be allowed to join the discussion. I must be willing to self-reflect, question and modify my practice in order to best teach my students. Never give up! All students can learn.
  • I commit to better support all my students by upskilling myself and collaborating with my Speech Pathologist to develop strategies to improve their functional literacy skills.
  • Found it really reassuring to know that there is a big pool of educators/allied health/parents that are interested in collaborative practice between and across professions to drive ground-up change around language and literacy in the classroom.
  • I was very encouraged by many speakers talking of the importance of mutual respect which is so vital for our working well together for the best for our students.
  • All professionals, all sectors working together for betterment of literacy learning for all.
  • Passion, communication, listen.
  • How can NDIS-funded service providers work more efficiently and effectively with schools, both public and private?
  • Collaboration and sharing the resources we already have available to us, in a creative and reflective way to bring about teaching/learning improvement.
  • We need to build in opportunities and a genuine purpose/sense of urgency for collaboration.
  • Tasmania needs mandatory regulations so every single school has to have a synthetic systematic PA approach in each school and a Speech Pathologist and/or literacy co-ordinator to have it implemented/recorded/adapted as needed and to help individuals as needed.
  • The speech pathologist in your school would love to be included. Please speak with us – not about us.
  • Working together is so important!
  • School wide approach connected to goals
  • Collaborating to achieve a systematic, school-wide coherent intervention that begins with high quality classroom teaching.
  • Collaborating between professionals is the best way to Implement an evidence-based approach to language and literacy instruction in schools.
  • Teachers: plan in collaboration with specialists. School Leaders: support this planning in to action. Together: measure impact on learning.
  • Collaboration through senior staff and Speech Pathologists to have discussion around the role of your speech pathologist.
  • I want to go back to school and look at our processes around behaviour especially in the secondary campus. Many of these students have poor verbal comprehension/receptive language. Revisit literacy intervention module in school. Have realised to a great extent the implications of low SES for language and literacy. Would like to know more about how to phase out the difference between slow 2nd (3rd…) language acquisition re. for EACD versus language problems.
  • What will an effective intervention model look like at my school? Realising that building a collaborative approach developing teaching capacity in literacy is a priority for my school.
  • SLP – Personal challenge to change mindset/practice – more whole class (or school level) intervention; less 1 on 1 therapy.
  • That parents, teachers and speechies remember the power of optimism/hope regarding a child’s abilities and capacity to learn.
  • We need to collect, analyse and learn from data on the impact of interventions to address literacy.
  • A “Whole School Approach” to everything based on collaborative, explicit teaching of evidence-based practice.
  • Needs to come from the top i.e. if we take on (as we should) explicit vocab instruction, leadership needs to insist this is a directive that all teachers must follow – it is not seen as an option.
  • Whole School Approach. True collaboration and the funding so we have access to a Speech Pathologist
  • I wonder what the first step would be to create greater collaboration with our fantastic SLP’s in our schools. Building greater collaboration with our SLP by having a conversation around how he/she would like to work? Modelling is very powerful for students and teachers in building capacity. Would personally love our SLP to model PA strategies in our classrooms if she is happy to do that.
  • Follow the evidence-base.
  • We need more funding and the role of the Speech Pathologist to be in the classroom, teaching our students, teachers and TAs.
  • I felt daunted due to my lack of experience in teaching, but the theme of collaboration is what I will take away most of all. It would be great to see strategic approaches that actually benefit students.
  • Key is working collaboratively (SLP and Senior Staff) – in top down approach (leading the school policy/commitment to literacy development).
  • Action
  • Find the money and prioritise #100percentliteracy.
  • Are there resources/a program SLPs can access and implement?
  • The connection between behaviour problems and language disorders.
  • School leaders need to make it a priority. Having the support of school leadership to get this working in schools.
  • Phonemic awareness needs to be a whole school, collaborative approach. Upskilling all staff so that PA skills don’t stop in the early years.
  • Department of Education Speech Pathologists are under-staffed and under-funded. Our caseloads are huge and limited with limited time at schools. If we are to assist teachers and school with #100percentliteracy, then we need more time at schools and a lot more of SLPs employed by DoE.
  • It’s so important to have principals and leadership propelling this literacy vision. But what if they don’t?
  • Once you’ve collaborated with a Speech pathologist, you will be a believer in the value of this process. Spread the word.
  • How to work together with schools to change ideas about what the DoE SLP service delivery model looks like – changing from Tier 3 1:1 therapy to a bigger focus in supporting schools to deliver whole-class Tier 1 programs. Getting “buy-in” for these programs amongst busy curriculum demands.
  • How to convince schools that are determined on improving data that oral language, even though it isn’t on NAPLAN & PAT-R, is the basis and we need to start here?
  • How can we get more speech pathologists on the ground?
  • How to get buy in? How to convince teachers not skilled up in this that it is a basis for programs not an extra on top of?
  • Oral language and vocab skills are crucial. How do we ensure explicit teaching of these skills carry on after early childhood/primary education?
  • Collaboration
  • We feel motivated and empowered but where to from here?
  • Collaboration between leadership, teachers and Speech and Language pathologists could lead to positive changes in students’ literacy development.
  • Introduce Speech and Language degrees at UTAS.
  • Synthetic phonics is vital for literacy development.
  • Speechies know a lot!
  • Where to now? It would be great to have access to Speech pathologists (and their resources) in the classroom (and not to just take out individual students). Needs to be more funding, training in Tasmania for SPs, opportunities for them to share their knowledge, resources with teachers. Collaboration.
  • Literacy for every single child.
  • How can we create opportunities to meet with teachers, speech pathologists and school leaders?
  • Early intervention is key!
  • We can all play a role in literacy development!
  • Funding for LST/AST/Literacy coach to do MSL program e.g. an evidence-based literacy development program.
  • DoE needs more funding!!
  • What is the best way to get staff buy in?
  • How will the system support us?
  • I can influence people in my networks?
  • How do we continue the discussion?
  • Team work
  • Movement
  • I’ve changed my view on wellbeing in schools after today. Wellbeing must include looking at a student’s possible language challenges/disorder for effective intervention.
  • We need to have well thought out systems and processes in place for school-wide success.
  • Students with vision impairment are disadvantaged from a literacy learning perspective. So it is really important that teachers of students with vision impairments are as effective/efficient at teaching literacy as possible (because often literacy is the context for teaching braille or adaptive technology). It would be great to have additional support from SLP to ensure best practice teaching.
  • Correlation between low literacy and so many other issues, outcomes and potentials in life.
  • We need to use speech Pathologists in schools in ways that will produce most effective and widespread long-term effects for all – not just short term effects for an individual student.
  • Trust the child wants to succeed. Trust the parent has their child’s interest at heart. Trust the teacher wants to help. Trust the experts want to share.
  • Many hands make light work.
  • Collaboration, trust, respect.
  • Collaboration between schools, parents and Speech Pathologists results in the best literacy learning outcomes for students. Intentional teaching of phonological awareness is essential.
  • The role of advocating for their children can be stressful, exhausting and emotional for parents.
  • Behaviour is communication.
  • Relationships and collaboration are critical to literacy learning.
  • Need for increased awareness and support for children when they need it.
  • Inclusive literacy and language development.
  • Collaboration brings confidence and can be a catalyst for change.
  • Intervention isn’t necessary on an individual level only. It can be incorporated into classes and all will benefit.
  • Continue to advocate – small steps can create big changes.
  • It is wonderful that we have opened up the lines of communication between SLPs and teachers. Let’s keep the momentum going – let’s all share our knowledge with at least one other educator.
  • Advocating for positive change.
  • What needs to be addressed in our current culture for parents or schools not to feel they are advocating for a child’s wellbeing in isolation?
  • There are amazing committed people out there.
  • I know this is predominantly about children, but what about the adults in the community?
  • Reading Writing Hotline: Never too late, 1300 00 2610.
  • Collaboration is the key to success.
  • How can we carry the knowledge to wider action?
  • As someone who has observed a lot of stagnation and rejection of learning, I was inspired by all the stories of change. I hope that I can do something to bring about positive change for my students.
  • The hope of possibilities that teachers can be more educated with skills to lift all children.
  • Despair no more!
  • Connection between various professionals feeds into enhanced experience at the workplace. Passion, career satisfaction. Knowing all that is possible has been done for the best outcome.
  • I commit to an increased focus on tier 1 speech, language and literacy.
  • Collaboration between educators, speech pathologists and parents is essential. Open relationships between parties. Respect for each other’s skills and knowledge and how each team member brings different and valuable skills. Empower each other, children and learners through literacy.
  • Gather together all the cohort of retired teachers to contribute their gifts to working with children with literacy challenges. In service training for all Tassie teachers in using the techniques started today with their children. University teacher training – mandatory to learn the most effective ways to teach remedial spelling and reading.

General Affirmation, Valued Encouragement & Links To ‘Big Picture’

  • Useful day of collaboration and exchange of ideas and points of view. Good to see some consensus. Good to see teachers acknowledge Speech Pathologists’ practice. Appears that Department of Education has less funding than Catholic sector? State vs Federal? Great to have affirmation of own ideas, beliefs and strategies.
  • Exciting to hear about school turn-arounds. There was plenty of info about great programs but I would have liked more specific, tangible ideas to take with me to use in the classroom. Was great to meet/hear so many different people and their stories. It was varied and informative. We also need 1 Speech Pathologist for each school and for more days.
  • SLPs are fantastic teachers! A wonderful opportunity to focus on excellent practice with my school and SLP colleagues (in our school, we are on “the same page”).
  • An interesting day with a good range of speakers and perspectives.
  • Thank you Chatter Matters for a wonderful day – it really did demonstrate collaboration between Speech Pathologists, teachers, parents and I think provide ideas for the way forward.
  • ‘Chatter Matters’ – what an amazing organisation. The day was great! Amazing and inspiring speakers, resources and questions. It is inspiring that we all share the same goals, ‘empower’, ‘collaboration’, ‘communication’ just to name a few. I have learnt so much just today and so happy I could attend.
  • This is inspirational and I commit to being a partner in driving the value of collaboration ensuring the right people are around the table. This is not just about education in the school setting, this is about building/coaching/enabling people to thrive as active citizens beyond school. The work is about not only improving literacy levels, but reducing the crime rate, people in/out prisons, those living rough. The work will change the world. Connecting with states like SA, connecting principals, universities and departments is the answer. Thank you Rosie and Chatter Matters’ team.
  • Thank you! For providing an informative, enjoyable and safe space to come and learn about how two professions can progress 100% literacy in Tasmania. I was able to come today because this was so affordable and open to anyone. Great for learning and networking. I also appreciate all the slides accompanying information. Many things to reflect on and question from today and questions I can take with me into my career in literacy. Now for action!
  • Thank you. I think this has been so important to break down barriers and open up the lines of communication so that all involved can work together to benefit our children.
  • Wonderful to hear from the diverse range of speakers. Fantastic to hear stories of cases where working collaboratively has been successful and to highlight some of the barriers. The next step/practical implementation will be an important conversation to continue to have.
  • Great mix of presentations. I especially loved hearing the parent and student voice and perspective. A great day of sharing. Well organised and structured. Good venue and catering.
  • Thanks Rosie this was a fantastic opportunity to engage in this important conversation. I value the chance to meet and start conversations with professionals in other settings. It is great to create the time and space to develop those relationships.
  • Chatter Matters is undertaking massively significant work in Tasmania. Please keep up the amazing social justice and education work!
  • Our destination is the same. Working together to get there – we do it better, faster and… It’s a lot more fun.
  • Thanks for the insightful and useful information!
  • Thought the day was very inspiring and eye opening about the thought of having a Speech professional help with our language/literacy work in classrooms. How do we go about getting one of you to come and help us spread the word with our 5x schools in a cluster?
  • The variety of speakers and their experience was a highlight for me. Time this afternoon to reflect and share with our peers was also very welcome. I’ve got several actions to refine and put into practice following these conversations.
  • Great day! Very inspiring. I would have loved to have the slides/handouts before the day – less anxiety about writing everything down. Thank you for a fantastic session!
  • Thanks for organising – great to hear everyone’s voice (students, parents, teachers and SLPs).
  • Congratulations Rosie, Rich and all at Chatter Matters. What a beautifully choreographed day- you should also be professional conference organisers!!! (Just another HAT to wear!!) Excellent presenters – all very authentic, generous, wise and willing to share what worked and what didn’t work, their fears, their failings, their break-throughs and their inspiring insights! We received many gifts today from you all! The workshop was the BEST and MOST SEAMLESS and RESPECTFUL experience I’ve ever seen at a conference. Well done!! Don’t stop! Don’t stop! Don’t stop! Don’t stop being fully self-expressed.
  • Thank you for your passion. It is contagious. I’m not a teacher or a Speechie, and have learned so much today. “The Whole School” idea is amazing. I feel a little daunted on how to be involved in the change, but very willing to keep talking about #100percentliteracy.
  • I feel very fortunate to have been able to attend today. I love the work you are doing for so many children in Tasmania. I look forward to working more closely with you at our school in the future. Thank you. Such a practical PL. I have learnt so much.
  • Thank you Chatter Matters for your leadership in the space of #100percentliteracy. You are helping unite many Tasmanians with the power to make change who come from across organisations/agencies. I’d love you to keep leading us.
  • Thank you for organising this informative PD, and continuing the discussion about literacy.
  • Thank you Rosie for putting this together. I loved the presentation of perspectives of a range of people with interest and experience in more effective literacy education – principals, SPs, teachers, parents and the research they’ve complied. Reflection process from individual to small group was very interesting and informative. Would love Pamela Thuan’s slides if possible – actually I can learn more through their website. I have also enjoyed your understanding that relationships underpin learning. Thanks! I hope Tassie can work out how to implement structural planning and guidance at Tier 1 level.
  • Enormous achievement – well done, friend.
  • The day was great, very thought provoking, positive and inspirational. There is now a certain buzz in the room. I guess the big thing is how to start and implement change and get some progress within schools.
  • This has been a superbly inspiring day. I feel full of confidence in being able to continue with my students learning journey!
  • Thank you so very much for all of your hard work which has gone into today. It has been totally worthwhile. I’ll certainly be interested and involved in the future.
  • Thank you! Keep up the force to drive this very important message. Literacy matters, language matters, kids matter.
  • Great day – opened my eyes to possibilities of models within schools. It was great to hear about examples of what that might look like.
  • Clear communication before event was held. Inspiring speakers and ideas. Would love to have heard a little more from first two speakers, e.g. time to unpack their slides (although am totally understanding of time restraints). I have lots of wonderings I now need to work through. Thank you.
  • A well-paced and informative professional learning day. It was great to hear from all stakeholders about how the effective teaching of literacy is a priority for all in Tasmania. We are all capable and competent learners! #BYO #Nametags
  • Thoroughly enjoyed the day. Very professional and informative. I have learnt a lot to take back to my colleagues. All the speakers were excellent, especially Pam. Fantastic.
  • Well organised day. Great speakers, good activities. Thank you.
  • Thank you so much for your work in raising awareness about Speech Pathology and evidence based interventions. Thank you for encouraging us all to work together. As you said, let’s keep talking about it.
  • A fantastic day hearing so many different stories from people who all have the common goal of enhancing literacy development for our kids.
  • Thank you! A great opportunity for shared conversation about literacy by people who want to make a difference. #chattermatters #100percentliteracy
  • I am really pleased that there seems to be more and more understanding that all behaviour is communication. I really hope this ‘whole of school’ and ‘whole of class’ implementation of not only S.P knowledge but also other health professionals such as O.T and psychologists etc, can actually happen and soon! Incorporating a bottom up approach is so beneficial for all learners (and educators).
  • Thank you for an insightful, educational and moving professional learning day. It was refreshing to hear from a variety of key stakeholders with regards to learning; especially in literacy.
  • Amazing organisation and smooth running of a fantastic seminar. Great speakers, pre-information, punctuality etc. Loved morning for learning, afternoon for reflection. Thank you.
  • To all involved with organising and to all presenters: Thanks for a well organised, professionally run day. It had many insights and many affective stories and presentations. While not an easy fit with my teaching situation, there are many principals and ideas that I have either been confirmed in, or will take away today and try to implement – a great group of participants and a great way to spread the “word”.

THANK you to all supporters and participants of Colleagues @ The Heart of Literacy – and particular thanks to anyone who has read this far: your passion is strong!

 

#100PercentLiteracy